Scientists Introduce Simpler, Faster CRISPR

An international team of researchers has made CRISPR technology more accessible and standardized by simplifying its complex implementation, according to the Baylor College of Medicine.

The simpler, faster CRISPR, which is presented in the journal Nature Communications, offers a broad platform for off-the shelf genome engineering that may lower the barrier of entry for this powerful technology.

“CRISPR technologies can be programmed to target specific sequences of genetic code and to edit DNA at precise locations, thus allowing research scientists to permanently modify genes in living cells and model organisms to explore gene function in the laboratory, including genes associated with human disease,” said co-first author Dr. David Marciano, instructor in the Olivier Lichtarge laboratory at Baylor College of Medicine.

Read the story on the Baylor College of Medicine website.

Topics: ,

Leave a Reply

Genetics

Latest News

Agrichemicals

BASF Registers New Active in India, Australia

The company anticipates further registrations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, China, and Argentina.

Asia

Valagro Launches Fertilizer Line in China

Valagro, an Italian supplier of biostimulants and other specialty nutrients, said it launched its water-soluble fertilizers, Master Supreme, to the Chinese market.

Agrichemicals

As Agchem Complexity Grows, Specialists Take Off Some of the Heat

Chemical companies increasingly are using specialist suppliers to outsource the process development and production of complex new molecules.

Precision Ag

Indigo Touts ‘New Approach to Agricultural R&D’

Indigo Research Partners uses a network of more than 50 of the largest U.S. growers to gather over a trillion data points daily from sensors, drones, weather stations, and other technologies.

Biopesticides

FaunaSmart, BioScience Solutions Form Innovative Collaboration in Crop Protection

FaunaSmart and BioScience Solutions have announced a cooperation within strategic business development and innovation strategies in crop protection. Harry Teicher,